Going Social

If you think back ten or more years, we weren’t very social.  Yes, we had email, but that was about it.  Facebook was an infant, there was no Snap chat, no Pinterest, no YouTube, no Instagram, and what about Yahoo groups and texting?  How did we get along?

Good and Bad

With these “advances” in technology we are able to communicate almost instantly.  If social media delightful quilting and sewingwe want to know something, we can easily Google on the internet, or post a question on a Yahoo or Facebook group.  Almost everyone has an opinion.  It is great to get feedback, pats on he back for our awesome posts, and find answers.  But, is everything out in cyber space reliable?  And, what about the time?  How much time is “social” stealing from us every day.  How much time is texting our friends with meaningless and random thoughts taking from our life?  Would we spend that much time talking on a land line phone every day?

The “Old” Days

I come from a generation of rotary phones.  In fact, my grandparents didn’t even have a phone, or even electricity for many years.  Yes, they were progressive and did get those as soon as they were available in the country, about 1938.  They farmed and when electric became available, it was a wonderful day when they could milk the cows with a milking machine and not by hand any more.

rotary phone delightful quilting and sewing

Rotary phone of the 1960’s.

When I was in college I met my future husband, Ron, at a farm auction.  He had just graduated from another college and was working on the family farm.  We dated once every other weekend (he only lived 30 miles away), he never called me except maybe two times, but we did write letters (stamps cost 5 cents).  Phone calls were out of the question, it was long distance which cost extra, although not nearly as much as what most cell phone plans cost today.  Phone calls were for business, emergencies, quickly pass along important information, but for our families, never just for talking.  In fact, when I was a kid we had a crank phone and our

crank phone delightful quilting and sewing

Crank phone of the 1950’s.

phone line was a party line with four other homes on the same line.  You had to pick up the phone carefully to see if anyone else was talking before cranking the phone to call the operator.  Yes, that also meant you could listen to someone else’s conversation.  So, word to the wise, be careful what you said on the phone as the neighborhood gossip might be listening.

Times Have Changed!

social media delightful quilting and sewing

Social media channels.

Today we have instant communication with our cell phones and texts and access to all kinds of information without going to the library, looking through a card catalog, and searching the stacks.  Today’s technology all comes with a price.  If we aren’t careful, it can steal our time, a lot of time.  And, the privacy we once enjoyed in our lives we no longer seem to covet as we post everything from our adventures, brushing our teeth, and family gatherings to what’s for dinner on Facebook and other social media.

One of the most challenging things with such easy access to information is sorting fact from fiction, weeding out bad advice from good advice.  Everything posted on social media, YouTube, Yahoo, and found in Google searches is not he best information.  In fact, there may be a lot of misinformation.  From medical information to fixing the refrigerator, or solving a longarm quilting problem, there is good information and there is bad information.

Know The Source

Just like years ago when we recognized reliable sources in the library, it is important to check the source online.  Today, everyone has an opinion, and many think they are experts, but they are not.  Before accepting and using advice offered online, check out who is making the post.  Questions to ask about the post:

  1. Who placed the post?  Are they an expert in the field or respected author on the subject?  What is their background, education, or training relating to the information.
  2. Can the information be substantiated in other posts or other websites?
  3. Does the information violate well documented principles, standard accepted practices, or break the law?
  4. Will the information be a compromise that might not even work?
  5. Does it sound logical, practical, or seem odd, outlandish, or ridiculous?

Longarm Application and Online Advice

As a Nolting longarm dealer that has been factory trained, dealer for two computer guided systems, and an author of a book for longarm guilting with Nolting machines, “Guide to Quilting with Your Nolting,” I am amazed at the poor, but well intentioned, suggestions relating to longarm quilting offered on social media channels.  Just because some weird thing happened to “solve” a problem doesn’t mean it is the correct solution.  Believe me, I have heard of some very interesting solutions, even using water bottles to take care of fullness on a loaded quilt.  Rarely do these suggestions address the root cause of the problem.  There are better solutions and solving or addressing the root issue is always the best.

Whether seeking info from a friend, YouTube, Yahoo group, Facebook, or any other social media source, sift the information well.  Make sure it comes from a reliable source, one that has both experience and knowledge, and that it addresses the root problem and isn’t a bandage.

 

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It Isn’t Always What It Seems

Have you ever jumped to a conclusion only to later, sometimes much later, discover your conclusion was very wrong?

Years ago I learned a valuable lesson relating to this that I have tried to apply in most situations, but recently forgetting to be careful in jumping to conclusion I spent needless time and effort going in the wrong direction.

About the Lesson I Learned

Years ago early in the year of my first year of teaching 7th grade science, I had a boy who was constantly causing an undercurrent of a disruption in class by leaning over to talk with first one neighbor, then another and another.  This happened nearly every day in spite of my warnings.  Finally I had enough of it and sternly told him to see me after class.  By the time the class ended he was in tears.  Trying to understand why he didn’t comply with my “no talking in class” rule, through tears he told me he was only trying to find out what I had written on the board. He simply could not see the board clearly and was trying to keep up with the class notes.  At this point I felt terrible for him.  I had pegged him as a trouble maker, but he was only trying to keep up.

Immediately he was assigned to a front row seat.  I contacted the school nurse to perform an eye test, and I also called his mother to let her know what had happened and that he probably would need a professional eye exam.  I was sure his situation and behavior in other classes was probably the same.  About a week later he showed up with glasses and he became a very good student.  What a lesson for a new teacher to learn about never assuming what you think based on appearances, but to get to the root cause so that there could be a positive outcome.

Summer Adventures and Wrong Assumptions

This past summer was hot and humid.  Had I been more diligent in trouble shooting these issue, I could have spent more time enjoying my sewing and quilting instead of being frustrated.

Experience #1 – My Home Sewing Machine

star blocks delightful quilting and sewing

Star blocks made from Alaskan theme fabric.

Because of the heat, I set up my travel sewing machine in our air conditioned first floor.  For a couple of hours on several days I happily stitched patches together making sub-units for star blocks.  At first the stitching was OK, but then seemed to erode.  The machine just didn’t seem to work as well.  The patches were getting caught under the presser foot, sometimes being pushed down in the needle hole.  It couldn’t be the humidity, that was taken care of by the AC unit.  I thought it must be the machine.  It is not an expensive machine, just one for travel.  I began thinking that I had made a poor purchase decision and because it wasn’t a top of the line machine, it was failing already and wasn’t going to last.

One afternoon after discovering a LOT of lint impacted in the feed dogs of my very nice machine, I decided to clean it.  I also discovered lint below and behind the hook and in bobbin area.  Working with cotton fabric, cotton thread, and quilts is a linty job.  I cleaned, oiled, and replaced the needle.  Since I was cleaning that one, I decided to take a look at my travel machine.  Very little lint, but I cleaned anyway, oiled where needed, and replaced the needle.

The next day when I worked on the star block sub-units using the travel machine, I was totally surprised.  The machine stitched beautifully.  You would think I would have thought to change the needle at the first sign of stitching problems, but I didn’t.  Yes, such a simple thing as a new, sharp needle made all the difference.  A good lesson refreshed in my mind.  Next time at the first sign of stitching problems, I will be changing the needle first.

Experience #2  – My Longarm Quilting Machine

As a Nolting longarm dealer, both my husband and I are factory trained to make some repairs on Nolting Longarm machines, as well as make adjustments, such as timing the machine.

Awhile back I began having trouble with the screw that holds the needle in the longarm and discovered that the threads in the needle bar had gotten stripped.  After talking with Nolting tech, we decided to replace the needle bar.  This is not difficult to do.  The needle plate comes off and the hook assembly is removed so that the old needle bar can be removed pulling it down and out through the open space in the throat of the machine.   Replacing he needle bar is the opposite procedure with timing the machine the final step.  When replacing the throat plate we noticed a little needle prick and smoothed that off, too.

I have timed many machines over the years.  Once you get the feel for it, it isn’t difficult.

damaged throat plates delightful quilting and sewing

Damaged throat plates – pricks and burrs from needle flex.

This day it did not go as well.  Every time I tried stitching after adjusting the timing, the thread would break. Several times I adjusted with the same results.  Finally my husband suggested replacing the throat plate with a new one.  Yes, something I should have through of right away, but didn’t.  Guess what?  It stitched perfectly.  My timing was perfect and not causing the thread breakage. Someplace in the needle hole of the throat place there was a sharp spot or burr that was catching the thread and causing it to break.  Again, a fresh reminder to me that it isn’t always what it seems to be.

Problem Solving

  1. Take a good look at the problem.
  2. Think about the possible causes.
  3. Don’t jump to a conclusion.
  4. Check out each of the possibilities starting with the most likely and easiest to fix, like changing the needle or replacing the throat plate.
  5. If the easiest fix doesn’t work, move on to the next possibility in the list until the solution is found.

Having an organized system for looking at a problem and checking out each possibility systematically can save time and long hours of frustration.  Because these situations are frustrating anyway and taking us away from what we want to do, we must step back, clear our thoughts, and look at the issue with fresh “eyes” and use systematic problem solving techniques.

For help trouble shooting longarm problems, “Guide to Quilting with Your Nolting” is available for Nolting longarm owners and may be an excellent resource for other longarm brands.  The book includes a trouble shooting chart with possible solutions and references pages in the books for help.

 

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The Enjoyment of Quilting Really Lovely Quilts

Taking in a customer quilt a few days ago, I was reminded once again why quilting for others is enjoyable.  Certainly not everything about quilting for others is enjoyable, such as those wonky quilts or quilts with wavy borders.  But, I do have the opportunity to quilt some really lovely quilts.  Quilts I would never think of or have the time to make.  Quilts made of fabrics that are over the top beautiful, fun, or even from another part of the world.

The most recent quilt was made by the Mom of a student I had a number of years ago when I was teaching high school science.  When she called the other day to make her appointment I never gave her name a second thought, that is, until just before she arrived.  Then I began wondering if she was who I though she was.  It was a pleasure to see Carol again, find out how the family was doing and where her son was today.  As teachers we remember our students as they were as kids.  It is often hard to picture these kids as grown up adults, off on their own, working, married and with children of their own.

Carol’s African Theme Quilt

Carol’s quilt is interesting, made for her daughter-in-law with fabrics her daughter-in-law purchased when she was on a mission trip to Africa.  Although we spent some time talking family, we did finally select an appropriate quilting pattern and thread to compliment the African fabrics.  It will be fun quilting an all over African type pattern and leaving a no-sew zone around the elephant.  The elephant needs custom quilting to emphasize its features.  I enjoy working with my customers and prefer to have their input into pattern design and thread color rather than just have them tell me to do what I want.  After all, it isn’t my quilt.  They should see what they would like.

Carol R quilt top

Quilt made by Carol R.

Interesting and Unique Customer Quilts

Thinking back over customer quilts, there are several that stand out because of the interesting quilt design which gave me the opportunity to quilt using fun techniques like echos, unique borders, fun fills, and even hand guided feathers and fill techniques.  Yes, this is all custom quilting.  And yes, you must charge more for it because it takes more time.

Abby’s quilt was made by a quilt club friend for her granddaughter.  Marcia designed her own applique and did a lovely job making the quilt.  Marcia picked out the wide border quilting pattern, butterflies, along with the thread.  The butterfly border is just a whisper on the quilt so it doesn’t detract from the applique.  The applique areas were lots of fun, echoing around each and filling in the background with fun fills like bubbles and clouds.  Each applique area has a different background fill.

Another friend I have known for many years made an applique quilt for her granddaughter, too.  This one, however, had very large applique flowers nearly 12″ across.  Patty’s instructions were no quilting over the flowers.  Again, echo around the flowers.  But, because of the large size, they did need quilting just to keep the quilt layers stabilized.  A spiral was quilted in the center of each with some detail in the petals, enough to hold the quilt together and add interest.  The highly patterned fabrics in the border and center was quilted with an edge-to-edge pattern.

Some quilts are just way too much fun to quilt, like Cindy’s octagon quilt.  This quilt was such a bright, cheerful quilt that she named it “Amusement.”  It needed a lot of fun quilting.  Planning the quilting for Amusement took quite a lot of time and several sketches of the blocks on my tablet using a sketching app before I finally decided on how to quilt the blocks and space between the blocks (sashing).  Cindy’s favorite color is orange, however when I told her I had selected purple to quilt the blocks, she decided on purple thread for everything.

Another more recent quilt, made by Norma, was a wall hanging.  It is a Judy Niemeyer paper pieced pattern with very large leaves in the center.  This quilt has a combination of batik fabrics that are interesting and fun to look at.  The border fabric is especially interesting with bubble filled paisley and, I thought, needed a really fun border treatment.  This quilting was a combination of both computer guided and hand guided quilting.  Although Norma doesn’t like a lot of heavy quilting, or the quilting to be too prominent, she was very happy with the quilting choices.

I am glad to have these interesting customer quilts come through my studio door.  They give me the opportunity to be creative and try different techniques.  It often takes time, sometimes days, to develop a vision for the quilting design I work up.  Once I have a vision, I am ready to get started.  And, depending on how much detail goes into the quilting, it may be several days, or more, before the quilt is finally finished.  For example, I worked on “Amusement” for well over thirty hours, just quilting.

Fortunately most of my customers piece their quilts very well which makes the job of quilting both easier and more enjoyable.  I enjoy the quilting even more when the quilts are interesting, have beautiful or interesting combinations of fabrics, or are unique in some way.  Although I can’t keep any of these beauties, I have enjoyed putting the finishing touches on them.

 

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It Costs WHAT!!!!

When we purchase a product or even consider a quilting class or workshop, we have an idea in our mind what it should cost and we would like to spend.  Of course, we would always like to spend as little as possible.  On the other hand, even when we pay little, we want high quality and value.

Why is it that sewing machines, embroidery machines, longarm machines, and even some classes and workshops cost so much?  Are they really worth that much?

Cost vs Value – Machines

Sewing machines have a very long history going back to 1846 with Elias Howe’s patent ofantique sewing machine the first practical sewing machine.  These machines were revolutionary and a huge improvement over hand stitching.  Can you imagine creating the wardrobe we enjoy today stitching all of those garments by hand?  Or even hand stitching the long dresses worn in the 1800’s? When sewing machines came out, women immediately could see their value.  They were a huge time saver allowing them to be much more productive making more clothing, giving them more time to work on other necessary tasks,or even allowing time to enjoy craft sewing.

Although the first machines were expensive at $300 ($10,000 in today’s money), Merritt Singer perfected the sewing machine and began selling them for $125 ($4,166 in today’s money). Singer offered the very first “buy now and make payments” ever was on any product.  What a novel and savvy business idea so that women could benefit from the use of the sewing machine while paying for it, possibly by making things for others.  Regardless of the cost of the sewing machine, it was worth the purchase because of the value it brought.

Fast forward to today’s sewing machines.  Quality sewing machines have many features that we enjoy, zig-zag stitching which offers many specialty and decorative stitches, needle down, scissors (we do love those!), a longer sewing bed, and more.  Could we do without those features?  Of course, but do we want to do without them?  NO, we love those features because they make our sewing more pleasurable, even easier and more productive.  Sewing machine manufacturers have noticed and designed machines with features we WANT.

How many of us have an embroidery machine, or a sewing machine with an embroidery

Nolting Longarm System with optional light bar

unit?  These machines are not cheap.  In fact, many cost more than most mid-range longarm systems, including the Nolting longarm CLX model I sell.  At quilt shows prospects are often shocked to find out that they could actually purchase a full longarm system (machine and frame) for what they paid for their embroidery sewing machine.  Are these machines and systems just expensive, high mark up, high dollar items, or is there more to the story?

Every product on the market, including sewing machines, embroidery machines, and longarm and computer guided systems have evolved from their simpler and less expensive counterpart, to what we see for sale today.  Over the years there has been a lot of changes, improvements, additions of features, and incorporation of electronic technology replacing mechanical in the product.  The total product costs include design and development, purchasing the raw materials, manufacturing costs, labor, overhead, transportation, and a little profit for manufacturer and seller.  This all add up.  The question is, do we find value and benefit in these improvements?  If the answer is “yes” and we want those improvements, then we must pay the price to have them.  In fact, to be truthful, our machines today are a value.  Based on pricing in the 1800’s converted to today’s dollars, many of these machines would cost between $30,000 and $40,000 for the basics!

Cost vs Value – Classes and Workshops

Now, what about workshops and classes?  A half day longarm hands-on class at a national quilt show will cost $200 or more.  Other classes will cost from $50 to $125.  Why so expensive?  (1) The show must cover its costs, venue, overhead, and profit.  (2) The teacher has expenses that include travel and lodging at the show and he/she expects to earn some money, not just cover expenses.  In fact, for some of these teachers, this is their only income, while others teach in addition to quilting, digitizing, or making show quilts.

Hands on technique workshop at Genesee Valley QuiltFest 2017

When you take any class or workshop, what are you really paying for?  Experience and knowledge.  That teacher has spent a lot of time, often many years, acquiring knowledge, practicing the skills, and developing techniques that they are willing to share with you.  You are actually buying years of experience.  Perhaps with time, a lot of time, you might stumble onto the techniques, and with a lot of practice get sort of good.  But, by taking a class and learning up front what works well, you can shave off years of trial and error and frustration.

Buying Years of Experience

Years ago I owned a carpet cleaning business.  Because my background is in education, naturally I felt learning everything I could about my business would be helpful.  My husband and I took 25 certification courses which were costly, included travel, often long distances to where they were offered, but in the end were the equivalent of a college education.  Because of what we learned, I built a high end, well respected business in our area.  What was more beneficial to my business than even the knowledge and techniques we learned on cleaning and restoration was the value of the experiences shared by our instructors.  We learned so much from our instructors, not only knowledge, but the valuable information they shared on their bad and often costly mistakes.  These were experiences we definitely did not want to repeat.  As a result, we were much smarter and more profitable in business early on because we didn’t make those same mistakes ourselves.

The same is true of the value of classes and workshops for quilters, regardless of the class or workshop.  It may be a class teaching a different technique, hands-on class, computer guided workshop, longarm class, or even an introductory how to use it class.  There is something to be gained from every workshop or class.  When you pay for that class or workshop, you are buying the years of experience of that teacher.  That knowledge and experience took time, often a long time and expense for them to acquire, and it can be valuable to you.

So, how do you justify that expense?  There is value and benefit in everything we learn.  I have always felt that no education is ever wasted.  It may not have immediate benefit, but at some point there is an “aha-ha.” moment and you remember something you learned.  When you think about your investment in your sewing “tools,” your sewing or embroidery machine, your longarm, or computer guided system, the cost of the workshop or class is a relatively small investment in its proper use, techniques that could save time or frustrations, or techniques that could expand your skill, capabilities, creativity and enjoyment.  If you own a business, continuing education can be written off as an expense.  And, regardless of whether you own a business or not, the value of what you learn, may in a very short time, have its own rewards.  A new skill or technique correctly learned will offer its own rewards, and for a business owner, it may very shortly return its value with increased efficiency or a new “service” to offer the customer.

It costs WHAT!!!  Don’t count the cost, look at and count the benefits and value.

 

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Quilt “Finds” in Golden

On a recent trip to Colorado we visited the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum.  The exhibit was very well done and quite enjoyable.  Our visit there, however, turned into a bit of an adventure when I discovered they had vintage quilt tops for sale.  The museum had recently acquired a number of very nice tops, all donated from various sources.  Occasionally after someone passes, the family finds quilts stored in dressers, closets, and trunks.  Because the family has no interest in these old quilts and doesn’t have anyone to give them to, they donate them to the museum.  I am sure some very fine examples may be saved by the museum, but usually the quilts and tops are sold to help support the mission of the museum.

Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum

Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum, Golden, CO

Quilt “Finds”

I was super excited to see fine vintage quilt tops for sale.  Here in New York, a few quilt tops become available, old quilts are sometimes found, but for me to see a large stack of old, vintage quilt tops was quite the “find.”  I looked through the pile, then was directed to another area of the museum store where there were even more quilt tops.  Tops ranged in age from the 1860’s through the 1970’s.  There were a number of 1930’s tops, feed sack tops, many different quilt patterns, applique quilts, many hand pieced, some pieced well, some not so well.  It was fun to see so many old quilts and to wonder about their history.

Wondering About The Past

As I thought about these quilts, especially the 1860’s to 1880’s quilts, I wondered if they traveled to Colorado in a wagon.  For the “newer” quilts from the 1900’s through the 1930’s, I wondered if they were made by pioneers in Colorado, or whether, they made the trip from some other place as people moved and resettled in Colorado.  Life in the early days of Colorado, the 1800’s even into the 1930’s was tough.  Women often lived in isolated and remote areas in the mountains, on farms, some lived in mining camps.  This was the old “west.”  Some of the tops looked like they were made just for bed coverings, yet others showed impeccable workmanship with tiny running stitches in the seams and excellent applique hand stitched with tiny blind stitches.

While at the museum I bought a book titled, “The Quilt That Walked to Golden,” written by Sandra Dallas with Nanette Simonds. (ISBN 13:978-1-9333081-7-3)  This excellent text is written from diary excerpts of many pioneer women and details “women and quilts in the mountain west from the overland trail to contemporary Colorado.”  I have found this book informative and very insightful in telling the story of these hardy and resourceful women, their lives, struggles, their heartwarming stories, and the hard realities of life on the frontier.

The title of the book is rather interesting.  The author points out that when pioneer women were preparing to leave the “comforts” of civilization in the East and travel by wagon to the west, they wanted to take some of the niceties they owned.  Dishes were often packed in flour and sugar barrels.  Dressers may have started the journey on the wagon, but were often discarded as the wagons became harder to pull across the high prairie.  And, of course, they wanted to take their best dresses.  Husbands, on the other hand, only thought about tools needed to carve out a new home, farm, business, or mine stake, taking enough quilts to keep warm, enough food, and other life-saving items.  In an effort to compromise, women often put on and wore all of the garments they could manage, including several petticoats and multiple dresses.  In spite of traveling with their wagon representing their new start in life, most of the settlers walked to the west.  As a result, their garments were not in very good shape when they arrived.  Not wanting to waste anything, the women cut up their dresses and made into quits.  Thus, the “quilt” was really a dress worn on the long, hard walk to Golden.

My Quilt Finds – Personal Selections

I originally left the museum that day with four quilt top finds.  I chose each of the quilts because of something unique about it.  All were in excellent condition, hand pieced except one with very tiny machine stitching and hand applique.

1860-1880 Applique.  Although with a few little stains, the fabrics in this quilt are in excellent condition and the fabric colors true and not faded.  It is large enough for a twin bed.  This applique pattern is not one that is often seen, it has excellent construction and almost new fabric condition.  I plan to longarm quilt this top with designs that might have been used in the period.  It will make a very nice display piece.

1930’s String Quilt, Star Pattern.  I selected this quilt for several reasons, the fact that it was string pieced by hand, the background fabric is purple, and that the star points cut from the string pieced fabrics are all hand stitched together.  The bonus with this quilt is that there is even some of the newspaper still on the string pieces star points.  A friend who is a quilt appraiser suggested keeping this top in an archival box, taking photos of the newspaper and trying to find out the origin of the newspaper.  I plan to do this as I think it will add to the interest of the top.  I would love to quilt it, but will keep it as is because of the historical nature.

Vintage 5-point Star – Feed Sack Material.  This top caught my attention because of its construction.  The white background feed sack fabrics were stitched together as squares by machine.  There are a couple of places you can see the printing on the material.  The machine stitching is excellent and with a very short stitch length.  The star points and center pentagon are all appliqued to the top.  Then, the fabric was cut out behind the stars.  There are a few water stains, but I think these will wash away.  The fabrics are very strong woven, the stitching, including the hand applique with very tiny stitches is also very strong.  I plan to longarm quilt this twin size with appropriate period designs.

1930’s “Enhanced” or “Improved” Nine-patch.  Looking at this top I am reminded of both a nine-patch and also the double wedding ring because of the melon shaped pieces.  Although not pieced as well as the others because it has long running stitches in the seams and the points do not come together very well in many places, the top is an eclectic mix of a wide range of 1930’s fabrics.  It is indicative of the thirties with both bold and soft colors and the many, many  prints that were available during this time period.  This large top will certainly cover a double or larger bed.  I will be quilting this on the longarm, too, using designs that would have been used in the thirties.

Not Quite Done!

After getting to the car to leave the museum, I reflected on my purchases and decided to go back into the museum and purchase one more quilt that I had seen.  I did not want to get back to my New York home and regret that I had not purchased this one.  This quilt was quite a lot more expensive than any of the others, but it was unusual.  Very large, about king size, the red, green, and yellow prints on white background was a triple Irish chain.  The quilt is beautifully pieced with tiny hand stitched piecing, precisely cut patches, is square, and has an unusual half square triangle border around the whole quilt.  It, like the others, is in excellent condition; it has a few little water stains, but has fabric that can take the quilting, the washing, and could even be used.   Like the others, I will use patterns to enhance the triple Irish chain pattern.

When we traveled to Colorado, I never expected to come home with these treasures.  It goes to show that you never know what you will find.  But, you must always be open to taking advantage of an opportunity as you many never have an opportunity like that again.   Fortunately my husband also saw this as a unique opportunity and encouraged me to take advantage of it, too.  Before we could fly home from Colorado, though, we had to go and purchase another suitcase just to carry our quilt top treasures home.  And, getting back home, what fun there has been for me to share with others this wonderful adventure and the quilt finds from Golden (Colorado).

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Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum – Worth the Trip

Quilt museums are few and far between.  Even regular museums often do not have a quilt collection, or if they do, rarely display that collection.  Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum is a little different.  It is the mission of the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum “to collect, preserve, exhibit, and educate the public about quilts; honor quiltmaking traditions; and embrace the evolution of the art and craft of quilting.”  This is accomplished through exhibits and special events.

Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum

Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum, Golden, CO

When we visited RMQM in September (2017) we were privileged to see two wonderful exhibits, the American Quilt Study Group (AQSG) “Civil War Era Quilts” and “Pagtinabangay: Quilts of Caohagan Island.”  Neither exhibit was so large that you couldn’t spend time reading the info plaques and posters explaining the project or display.  It was interesting that these two exhibits were on display at the same time as the quilts varied considerably from each other.  One, of course, documenting American quilts from the 1850’s and 1860’s.  The other displaying the introduction of and growth of quilting into a sustainable means of income for a small group of people on a very small island in the Phillippines.

Civil War Era Quilts

Civil War Era Quilts is the result of an American Quilt Study Group quilt study completed in 2014.  It is a collection of reproduction Civil War Quilts reduced in size to a maximum of 200″ perimeter.  The original quilts were made from 1850 to 1865. It was interesting to read how each quilt study group maker researched that particular quilt and decided how to make a reproduction of it.  Quilt reproduction received much attention to detail using fabrics very similar to original often quilted by hand.  One the makers even went to to the trouble of harvesting cotton by hand, prepared it, and used it as “batting” in the reproduction.

Pagtinabangay: Quilts of Caohagan Island

Introduced to quilting by a Japanese woman who was highly trained in the “art” of quilting, several Caohagan Island residents along with one young girl began to make quilts with fabric brought to them by the Japanese woman.  Slowly others began to take up quilting, even a few men.  When they found that their quilts could be sold, many more began quilting.

Quilters have always been industrious and resourceful people. Quilters use what is available, fabric and fabric scraps, and spend precious time cutting, piecing and quilting. Quilts often reflect the culture and life of those making them. The quilts of Caohagan Island do this, as well, as the “colors and patterns evoke the tropical environs, while the handicraft is of the highest caliber. The results are quilts that evoke a far-away place but retain a human touch to which anyone who views them can relate.”  As I looked at the many quilts on display, it reminded me of the lovely pictorial art my nine year old granddaughter enjoyed drawing.

Worth your time to visit.

If you travel to Colorado, be sure to visit Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum in Golden, Colorado.  You will not be disappointed.

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Borders Can Make or Break the Quilt – Do It Right

Quilters often take a lot of time piecing their blocks and square them up before assembly.  The body of the quilt looks wonderful, color choices are excellent, and the quilt has the potential to be beautiful.  That is, until the borders are added.  As a professional Longarm quilter, the borders are where I often see many problems.  Incorrectly applied borders often lead to puckers, pleats, wavy borders and dog-eared quilts.  All of this can be avoided.

Although you may not realize it, one of the functions of borders is to stabilize and square up a quilt.  Throughout the body of the quilt are cut (unstable) edges around the outside of each of the blocks  Even though the patches may be cut on grain, the cut edges can stretch easily.  When borders are added correctly to a quilt top, the edges of the body of the quilt are contained and restricted within the new measurement.  The key word here is, applied or added correctly to achieve this.

problem quilt

A quilt that could use borders to stabilize and square it up.  Notice distorted sides and wavy bottom on this quilt.

Incorrect method for adding borders

Cut or make a long strip, stitch to one of the sides of the quilt and cut off the extra.  Because no measuring is done with this method, you have no idea how long one side of the quilt is compared with the opposite side of the quilt.  If one side stretches out a little more when the border is stitched on, that side will be longer leading to a dog-eared quilt.  Do not use this method to add borders to any quilt.

quilt by Sally Mowers

Quilt with correctly applied borders hangs straight.
Dresden Plate, designed, made and quilted by Sally Mowers

Correct method for adding borders

Even though it takes a little longer, the correct method for adding borders involves measuring, using a little math, and perhaps easing in fullness.

  1. Measure across the area in three places, near the top and near the bottom, but never along the edge, and across the middle.
  2. Average the three measurements and use the average as the measurement to cut the length of both borders.
  3. Quarter the quilt top marking with pins. Quarter the border strip marking with pins.  Align the quarter marks and pin the border to the quilt.  Pin between the quarter marks distributing any fullness evenly.
  4. Placing the fullest side down, stitch together. When the fullest side is down, the feed dogs on the machine gently pull the bottom through a little faster than the top.  There are no puckers or pleats on the top or bottom.
  5. Press the border seam outward toward the border.
  6. Measure across the quilt and borders in three places, similar to #1, average the measurements as in #2.
  7. Follow steps #3-5 to add the other border.

For a visual of this technique, see the video below by Dee Christopher.  Video also demonstrates a bonus no math method for determining size of a pieced border.

Whether you quilt your quilts yourself or have them quilted professionally, by taking the extra time to add borders correctly, your quilts will look much better with square corners and straight sides.

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Safety in the Quilting Studio

Nothing can put your life on hold like an injury.  It is unexpected and unplanned.  Depending on the severity of the injury you can have daily activities and hobbies upset for a few hours, a few days, or even weeks.

After my husband sliced the skin off the tip of his finger yesterday with a box knife, I wasinjury clipart reminded even more of the need to be careful in the sewing room.  In the sewing room we work with rotary cutters that are equally as sharp as the box knife.  It doesn’t take much for an injury to happen, a careless (or not so careless) placement of the ruler, not thinking about where we place our hand and fingers, or even not thinking and leaving the safety off and the rotary cutter blade exposed for “just a second.”  There are even other hazards, such as pins and needles, sharp scissors, and electric cords running in different directions.  Although you may feel you have everything under control, if you have young children, grandchildren, or pets that roam through your quilting space, rotary cutters, pins and needles and stray cords are tempting, hazardous, and potentially deadly.  Pets are even attracted to things that adults and children would ignore.  For example, one of my Longarm customers needed a switch replaced on her Longarm because the cat, who liked to jump up on the frame and lay on the quilt, chewed the cap off the machine switch.  Fortunately for the cat, the machine was unplugged.

think safety first posterAlways think “Safety First.”  Whether you are cutting, sewing, pressing, or any other task, always think about your safety and the safety of others, including your pets.

Cutting Safety:

  • Replace mats that have grooves and marks that have not “healed.”
  • Replace the blade in the rotary cutter regularly. Dull blades do not cut well, need more pressure to cut, and may slip out of the fabric causing a wrong cut, damaging the ruler or hurting you.
  • Purchase rulers that have a non-slip surface, such as Creative Grids rulers,
    non-slip cutting rulers

    Creative Grids non-slip rulers and InvisiGrip non-slip static cling sheets.

    including the Stripology Ruler, or place InvisiGrip™ on the bottom of rulers. This clear static cling film provides a non-slipping surface on the bottom of the ruler.  Slipping or sliding rulers not only result in poor cuts, but can contribute to damage to the ruler from the blade and possible danger to the quilter from a cut from the rotary cutter.  After testing InvisiGrip™ on my 24” cutting ruler I have decided to put it on all of my clear rulers.  I have been very impressed that is really does provide a non-slip surface.

  • Use an elevated cutting table to work at a comfortable (and safe) height. A cutting table can easily and inexpensively be made from a short folding banquet table and lengths of PVC pipe cut 10-12” long and put under each leg.
  • Make sure the cutting area has good lighting and is clear of stray pins.
  • Keep your non-cutting hand behind and away from the direction and angle of the rotary cutter.
  • Always close the cutter after every use.

Quilting Room or Studio Safety:

Think "Safety First"

Think “Safety First”

  • Work in a well-lighted space.
  • Always use a pin cushion or magnetic pincushion to keep pins and needles secure. Invest in a magnetic wand to swipe across the floor to pick up any stray pins that have fallen.
  • If children or pets frequent the area, make sure dangerous items like pins and needles, scissors, and rotary cutters are put away. It isn’t a matter of organization, although that helps, it is a matter of “safety first.”
  • Never use an extension cord with the iron. Most extension cords are not heavy enough for the wattage draw and it could cause a fire.
  • Even if unplugged, a dangling electric cord from the iron can be a temptation to children and pets that might pull on it causing the iron to fall off the ironing board and onto the pet or child causing injury.  Always place the unused iron in a safe location.
  • Avoid running cords across traffic lanes. Tripping and falls are the number one cause of injury in adults ages 65 and over.  Even if you are younger, it is still dangerous to have cords across the path.
  • Always unplug the iron and sewing and/or quilting machines when not in use. Who knows what else could happen, but most have sensitive electronics in them that could be damaged by power surges or lightning strikes.  This type of damage is never covered under the product warranty.
  • Pets are attracted to dangling thread, thread spools and cones. They are wonderful toys!  But, they can be dangerous and deadly to your pet.  Make sure thread is put away and not a temptation.
  • Longarm owners with pets – the dangling quilt top and batting seems to be a wonderful place to play hide and seek, a great place to sleep, or claw. Dogs seem to especially like to chew the batting.  Cats also seem to like to jump up onto the frame and sleep on the quilt, like a hammock.  The Longarm is such a temptation.  You could close the door to the studio, put a shower curtain (plastic) over the quilt, or use strips of aluminum foil to reduce the temptation.  If you have other great solutions, please post them below in comments.

injury prevention planSafety first is a habit.  Take a critical look at your quilting area, make provision for safe, but convenient, storage for dangerous items, develop a procedure for putting things out of harm’s way and shutting things off when you leave your space. Get into the habit of always thinking about and doing the “safe” thing.  It may take a few seconds longer, but a careless unsafe move can cost hours, days, weeks or more of pain and the inconvenience of not being able to enjoy your time sewing and quilting.

 

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Bleeding Fabric – Saving Quilts from Disaster

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Patriotic color quilts for Veteran Quilt Project

The last few weeks I have been completing and quilting three 48×60 inch quilts for a veteran project for our local quilt club.  A few years ago the club decided to honor each veteran in the town with a quilt.  Although a small town, there are a couple of hundred veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, through recent deployments to the Middle East.  The club has already given quilts to WWII veterans and the goal now is about 120 quilts for Korean, Vietnam, and other veterans.  Did I mention the club only has about 25 members?

After making and quilting the quilt, we wash the quilt and stitch on the label which will include the name of the recipient and that it is given by the club to honor them for their service to our country.  All of the quilts in any pattern are shades of red, white, and blue.  The club has a block of the month activity which supports our quilt efforts.  Each month those participating make a r/w/b block or blocks.  Whoever “wins” the drawing gets to take the blocks home, assemble and quilt the quilt. In addition, we have a couple of sit and sew days during the year to work on more quilts.  Members are always welcome to make quilts on their own, too.

Today I washed the three quilts that I had been working on, two quilts made from a Jenny Doan pattern (info below) and one from block of the month blocks I had won several months ago.  Since the quilt fabrics were not pre-washed before making the quilt, I decided it might be a

Color Catcher sheets to catch fugitive dyes.

Color Catcher sheets to catch fugitive dyes.  White sheet shown below the box.

good idea to put a “Color Catcher” sheet ($5.29 for box of 24) in the washing machine with the quilts.  The color catcher sheets pick up fugitive dyes released from the fabrics that would otherwise migrate to other fabrics in the quilts.  A red to blue, or blue to red migration might not be very noticeable, but certainly either of those colors to white would show up.  I am very glad that I put the color catcher sheets (2) in the washer as they both captured red dye and some blue.  The quilts look fabulous with no evidence of any dye migration.

What happens if you do not use color catchers in the washing machine and the dye

Center color catcher with red and blue dye captured. Right color catcher before. Left color catcher with little dye as it got caught in the washer drum.

Center color catcher with red and blue dye captured. Right color catcher before. Left color catcher with little dye as it got caught in the washer drum.

migrates?  Is the quilt ruined, or is there hope?   Because the dyes migrated once, they may still be unstable and able to be released from the fabric and “caught.”  I found additional help from another  blog post that offers several solutions and shows testing of several methods that can be used to try and capture the fugitive dyes from fabrics.

Although there might be hope to capture the fugitive dyes after the fact, using color catcher sheets the first time fabric is washed is probably better.  When I pre-wash my quilting fabrics (before making the quilt), I always toss in a couple of color catcher sheets.  Because my two quilts were made with strips, they were not pre-washed.  As a result, it was very important to capture any fugitive dyes during the wash using the color catcher sheets.  If little or no dye was released during the wash, great!  At least I was taking preventative measures just in case there were fugitive dyes.

quilts

Pattern: Jack and Jill by Jenny Doan

Quilt pattern called Jack and Jill by Jenny Doan.  Pattern directions using jelly rolls make a quilt 73″ x 83.”

 

 

 

 

 

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How Cotton Fabric Is Made Ready for Your Quilt Shop

We all use it, cotton fabric.  In fact, most quilts are made of cotton fabric.  Years ago fabricfabric was manufactured in the United States from cotton grown in the US.  Today, although the US grows cotton, nearly all fabric is manufactured outside of the US.

After the cotton is harvested and woven into the fabric called greig (pronounced gray) goods (unprocessed woven fabric), there are many steps that it must go through before it is ready to be dyed and shipped to your local quilt shop.   This video, filmed in a fabric plant in Hong Kong and Zhejiang, China takes you through the many steps needed to prepare the fabric, then dye, set the dyes with chemicals and heat, and finally wash and prepare the fabric for shipping.  I think you will find it interesting to see all that goes into making the beautiful and colorful quilting fabrics that we enjoy using in our quilts.

As you watch the video, remember that this was filmed in China.  China does not have the same standards of safety and cleanliness in their factories that are required by OSHAH here in the US.  For example, wet floors, the haze in the air from the chemicals and dryers, and even allowing long hair on workers would all be violations, each occurence of each violation with a $5,000 fine here in the US.  Our OSHAH inspectors would have a heyday writing up violations in a factory like this one.  However, because the labor is cheap and there are few, if any, work safety standards to worry about, we benefit by being able to purchase a huge variety of fabrics at a relatively low cost.  If fabric were manufactured in the US with our much higher labor costs and cost of compliance to regulations, we would be paying much, much more.

So, please take the video at face value and appreciate all of the work that goes into creating our wonderful quilting fabrics.

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